General Data Cleaning Instructions

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The cleaning program makes a variety of changes automatically; these changes appear in a file called "reelid.CNG." We are pretty confident of these automatic changes, so you do not ordinarily have to deal with the .CNG files.

The program also generates a file with the extension .MSG that marks eight potential problem areas. These problems are generally too complicated to be handled by machine. The eight messages are listed below, together with their approximate frequencies:

Message Freq. (*)
(xx) Probably related to head 18
(xxi) Child has different surname from head 1
(xx) Child/Parent age difference unlikely 11
(xx) First positionnot HEAD 15
(xx) WIFE not in second position 9
(xx) Blank REL 9
(xx) Bad SEX and REL combination 11
(xx) Operator Comment: REL ERR; relation 10

The (xx) indicates the person number within the dwelling that the message refers to. After the message or messages, the main fields for all members of the dwelling are printed. As in the following example, many problems are identified by more than one message. Note that a lower case marital status or an asterisk in the first column of the relationship field indicates that the field was inferred by the cleaning program. In this case, Suckie Jerkins, person 8 in the dwelling, is clearly not the wife of the family head, but rather the daughter-in-law, as was noted by the operator.


Dwelling [316 6562 40]    Rule: 1    DWSIZE: 8    NBRFAMS: 999    SEQFAM: 1    FAMSIZE: 9999    NBRTAKEN: 8
(8) WIFE not in second position
(8) Operator Comment: REL ERR; DAU IN LAW

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBP
(1) 0 JERKINS R.S. W M 57 HEAD m FARMER GA GA GA
(2) 0 JERKINS HARRIETTE W F 56 WIFE m HOUSE KEEPER GA SC SC
(3) 0 JERKINS CATHRINE W F 35 DAU S HOUSE KEEPER AL GA SC
(4) 0 JERKINS HICKMAN W M 21 SON S FARM LAB AL GA SC
(5) 0 JERKINS THO.S W M 20 SON S FARM LAB AL GA SC
(6) 0 JERKINS REISEN W M 13 *SON s FARM LAB AL GA SC
(7) 0 JERKINS JH W M 30 SON M FARM LAB AL GA SC
(8) 0 JERKINS SUCKIE W F 16 WIFE M FARM LAB AL GA SC

Just over half of the cases identified in the MSG file will require a change. All changes should be made strictly on the basis of information in the file; don't bother to look at anything on the microfilm. If you can't figure out what you should do, make your best guess and enter it in ISSA. Also mark the change on the paper copy of the MSG file, and I'll take a look at it.

Most of the changes involve inferring family relationships or altering the division of dwellings into families. The basic principle is that the family relationship variable should always indicate the relationship of each individual to the family head, and the family head must always be the first person listed in any family taken under sampling rules 1 or 2.

This necessary changes may be accomplished in any of three ways:

  1. a family relationship may be inferred on the basis of other available information (see page 3)
  2. two families in a dwelling may be merged into one (see page 8)
  3. a related group that is apparently unrelated to the household head may be identified as a secondary family (see page 10).

The following sections describe how to make the changes. The discussion is organized by message type, rather than by the type of change required. Since some kinds of changes may be signaled by several different messages, you may have to look around a little to find the appropriate case.

1. (xx) Probably related to head

This message appears whenever an individual with no explicit family relationship to the household head has the same surname as a previously listed family member. About 60 percent of the time it is possible to make a reasonable guess about what the relationship should be. Check the ages, surnames, marital statuses, birthplaces, parental birthplaces, and races to inform your decision. If you think you know what the relationship should be, enter it in the relationship field with a '@' in the first column in the field. The @ will flag the case as a hand imputation. If you don't think you can make a reasonable guess, skip the case and don't worry about it.

Example 1. This is a slightly tricky guess. Person 9, Siddy L. Harp, appears to be a child of Jain Harp, who is the daughter of the head. Siddy's mother's birthplace, however, is GA, and Jain was born in AL. Thus, if Siddy is really Jain's daughter, either her parental birthplaces are backwards or Jain's sex and relationship are listed wrong. But the other two grandkids have the same problem, so it seems reasonable to assume that Siddy should be a G SON. Therefore, you should enter '@G SON' in the relationship field. Don't worry about the problem with the parental birthplaces; we have decided to handle those by computer at a later stage.


Example 1:

Dwelling [291 6161 45]    Rule: 5    DWSIZE: 9999    NBRFAMS:999    SEQFAM:999    FAMSIZE: 9    NBRTAKEN: 9
( 9) Probably related to head
( 9) Operator Comment: REL; G SON

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S Age Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MB
(1) 360 STRICKLAND MARGRETT W F 44 HEAD W HOUSE KEEPING AL GA NC
(2) 360 STRICKLAND WILLIAM W M 21 SON S FARMING AL AL AL
(3) 360 STRICKLAND JOHN W M 18 SON S FARMING FL AL AL
(4) 360 STRICKLAND ROBERT W M 14 SON S FARMING AL AL AL
(5) 360 STRICKLAND JOSEPH W M 8 SON S AL AL AL
(6) 360 HARP JAIN W F 25 DAU W AL AL AL
(7) 360 HARP MARGRETTA W F 6 G DAU S AL AL GA
(8) 360 HARP JOHN W M 2 GD AU S AL AL GA
(9) 360 HARP SIDDY L W F 6 % S AL AL GA

Example 2. This case is pretty typical; one basic error generated a whole slew of messages. George E. Morton is clearly the son of George B. Morton, and that relationship should be inferred. Mary A. should then be changed to daughter-in-law, and the kids should be changed to grandkids.


Example 2:

Dwelling [ 6 2961 30] Rule: 1 DWSIZE: 7 NBRFAMS: 1 SEQFAM: 1 FAMSIZE: 7 NBRTAKEN: 7
(3) Probably related to head
(3) Operator Comment: REL ERR; COHEAD OR SON
(4) WIFE not in second position
(4) Operator Comment: REL ERR
(5) Operator Comment: REL ERR
(6) Operator Comment: REL ERR
(7) Operator Comment: REL ERR

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBP
(1) 44 MORTON GEORGE B W M 71 HEAD M FARMER MASS MASS MASS
(2) 44 MORTON MARY A. W F 69 WIFE M MAINE MAINE R.I
(3) 44 MORTON GEORGE E W M 43 M FARMER MASS MASS MAINE
(4) 44 MORTON MARY A. W F 37 WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE MASS MASS VER
(5) 44 MORTON CLARENCE E W M 14 SON S ATTENDING SCHOOL ILLINOIS MASS MASS
(6) 44 MORTON LESTER R. W M 11 SON S ATTENDING SCHOOL ILLINOIS MASS MASS
(7) 44 MORTON HATTIE W F 4 DAUGHTER S ILLINOIS MASS MASS

Example 3. At first glance, it looks like Milly Shinger might be a sister of M.V. Shinger, but there is a lot of evidence against it. First, Milly is black and the rest of the Shingers are white. Second, Milly's parental birthplaces differ from F.V.'s. Therefore, Milly's relationship field should not be altered. If Milly were white and her parental birthplaces matched F.V.'s we would be safe to assume that she was a sister. But we wouldn't want to lose the fact that she was listed as a servant of the head. In such a situation, you would enter '@SISTER/SERVT' in the relationship field. Do the same trick when apparent relatives are listed as boarders.


Example 3:

Dwelling [258 5631 1]    Rule: 1    DWSIZE: 6    NBRFAMS: 1    SEQFAM: 1    FAMSIZE: 6    NBRTAKEN: 6
( 4) Probably related to head

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBP
(1) 18 SHINGER F.V W M 51 HEAD M KEEPS HOTEL FL NC GA
(2) 18 SHINGER MARY W F 45 WIFE M KEEPS HOTEL FL NC NC
(3) 18 SHINGER SARAH W F 41 SISTER IN LAW W NO OCCUPATION FL NC NC
(4) 18 SHINGER MILLY B F 60 SERVANT S COOK VA NOT KNOWN NOT
(5) 18 ENDER J W M 47 BDR M WATCHMAKER ENG ENG ENG
(6) 18 ENDER ROSEY W F 52 DR S NO OCCUPATION LA FRANCE FRAN

2. (xx) Child has different surname from head

This message can indicate a variety of different problems. Sometimes it occurs because a mother has remarried. If this looks likely, then the kids should actually be stepchildren, and you should enter '@STEPSON' or '@STEPDAU' as appropriate.

In about ten percent of cases, a different surname occurs because the operator has failed to correctly indicate a NAME REV in the comment field. These cases should be corrected by adding the NAME REV where it belongs. Even more common are cases where there are slight spelling differences between the head and child. These should be corrected. In general, you should standardize the spellings by adopting the head's spelling, unless it looks implausible. It is important to correct these two errors, because surname similarity will be used for parent-child linking.

Twenty percent of the time a surname difference occurs because the kid is not really a kid of the head, but rather the kid of a servant, boarder, or other relative. If the immediately preceding adult shares the surname of the kid and is of a reasonable age to be a parent and there are no parental birthplace conflicts, it is safe to assume that they are the true parent and alter the kid's relationship codes accordingly.

NOTE: If the kid is a child of a person with a blank relationship field who is apparently unrelated to the family head, you are probably looking at a secondary family situation, which is discussed on p. 10.

Examples 4 and 5. Annie Pipper is the daughter of Lucie, so her relationship code should be altered to '@SERVANT'S DAU'. Betsy Johnson is the daughter of Sarah, so her code should be altered to '@G DAU'.


Example 4.

Dwelling [176 241 20] Rule: 1 DWSIZE: 4 NBRFAMS: 1 SEQFAM: 1 FAMSIZE: 4 NBRTAKEN: 4
( 4) Child has different surname from head

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL
(1) 92 ALLEN ALBERT A. W M 29 HEAD M FARMER KENTUCKY VIRGINIA
(2) 92 ALLEN SARAH W F 2S WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE KENTUCKY KENTUCKY
(3) 92 PIPPER LUCIE B F 35 SERVANT S SERVANT KENTUCKY KY
(4) 92 PIPPER ANNIE B F 8 DAUGHTER S KENTUCKY KY

Example 5.

Dwelling [246 542 44]    Rule: 1    DWSIZE: 3    NBRFAMS: 1    SEQFAM: 1    FAMSIZE: 3    NBRTAKEN: 3
( 3) Child has different surname from head

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL
(1) 742 HUNTER BETSY B F 65 HEAD W KEEPING HOUSE SC SC
(2) 742 JOHNSON SARAH B F 40 DAU W SC SC
(3) 742 JOHNSON BETSY B F 13 DAU S AL AL

Occasionally, a daughter will have a different surname because she is really married but is incorrectly listed as single. If it looks clear that she is really married to a son in law, change her marital status to M and put the comment '@MARST' in the comment field.

3. (xx) Child/Parent age difference unlikely

This message appears when a person listed as child is fewer than 14 years older than the family head. It often appears in conjunction with the previous message. When it appears by itself, it may mean that the kid is actually a another relative of some kind; try to guess. It can also mean that a woman has remarried a younger man -- check the parental birthplaces to see if a stepchild thing is happening. This message also often appears in conjunction with the following message, so I'll talk about them together.

4. (xx) First position not HEAD

Most of the time this message means that you should change the first position in the family to '@HEAD', but about a third of the time it is a little more complicated. If the first position is listed as a family member, check to see if the other relationships in the household are OK.

Example 6. In this case, John Martin should be changed to '@HEAD'. Nancy Martin is OK, but the relationships of the rest of the family are wrong; they should all changed to '@SISTER' or '@BROTHER'.


Example 6:

Dwelling [ 53 4681 2]    Rule: l    DWSIZE: 7    NBRFAMS: 1    SEQFAM: 1    FAMSIZE: 7    NBRTAKEN: 7
(1) First position not HEAD
(1) Child/Parent age difference unlikely
(3) Child/Parent age difference unlikely
(4) Child/Parent age difference unlikely
(5) Child/Parent age difference unlikely
(6) Child/Parent age difference unlikely
(7) Child/Parent age difference unlikely

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBP
(1) 23 MARTIN JOHN W M 21 SON S WKS IN PAPER MILL WV PA WV
(2) 23 MARTIN NANCY W F 46 MOTHER M KEEPS HOUSE WV PA ENG
(3) 23 MARTIN JENNIE W F 23 DAU S LIVES AT HOME WV PA WV
(4) 23 MARTIN BELLE W F 19 DAU S LIVES AT HOME WV PA WV
(5) 23 MARTIN WILLIAM W M 17 SON S WKS IN PAPER MILL WV PA WV
(6) 23 MARTIN ARMEDA W F 16 DAU S GOES TO SCHOOL WV PA WV
(7) 23 MARTIN MCCLELLAND W M 15 SON S LIVES AT HOME WV PA WV

IMPORTANT: When a family relationship other than head appears in the first position of the second family in a dwelling, it often refers to the relationship of the individual to the first person in the dwelling. In these cases, we have adopted the policy of letting the relationship field take priority over the family numbers.

Example 7. Vance Hammel is clearly the son of Crawford, but he is listed as the first person in the second family of the dwelling. We assume that the family relationships are correct, which means the family numbers are wrong. To fix the problem:

  1. change all the family numbers 123 to 124;
  2. put the string 'FNUM*ERR' in the comment field of Vance; this will generate a flag indicating that a new family number was suppressed, so users can split the family up if they wish;
  3. change the NBRFAMS variable to 1;
  4. change the number in first family to 8.

There is also a different surname problem with Example 7. It is virtually impossible that the Grubs are the kids of Crawford and Prudence, because they are just too young, and they are certainly not the kids of Vance. My guess is that they are Nancy's kids; Nancy must have changed back to her maiden name following her divorce, but the kids kept the father's name. Thus, I would change the Grubs to grand-kids.


Example 7:

Dwelling [ 76 2892 29] Rule: 1 DWSIZE: 8 NBRFAMS: 2 SEQFAM: 1 FAMSIZE: 4 NBRTAKEN: 8
(5) First position not HEAD
(7) Child has different surname from head
(8) Child has different surname from head

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBPL
(1) 123 HAMMEL CRAWFORD W M 69 HEAD M LABOURER PENSYLVANIA PA PA
(2) 123 HAMMEL PRUDENCE W F 61 WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE PENSYLVANIA PA PA
(3) 123 HAMMEL NANCY W F 27 DAUGHTER D PENSYLVANIA PA PA
(4) 123 HAMMEL JOSEPHINE W F 19 DAUGHTER S LIVNG OUT PENSYLVANIA PA PA
(5) 124 HAMMEL VANCE W M 11 SON S PENSYLVANIA PA PA
(6) 124 HAMMEL CRAWFORD W M 6 SON S PENSYLVANIA PA PA
(7) 124 GRUB MARGARET W F 4 DAUGHTER S PENSYLVANIA PA PA
(8) 124 GRUB JOHN W M 1 SON S PENSYLVANIA PA PA

Example 8. Same basic idea as example 7. Make it one family, and change Esther to a daughter-in-law.


Example 8:

Dwelling [ 304 2612 1]    Rule: 1    DWSIZE: 4    NBRFAMS: 2    SEQFAM: 1    FAMSIZE: 2    NBRTAKEN: 4
(3) First position not HEAD
(3) Operator Comment: REL ERR;HEAD

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBPL
(1) 26 MILLIGAN ROBT W M 73 HEAD M MILLER PA PA PA
(2) 26 MILLIGAN SARAH W F 68 WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE PA PA PA
(3) 27 MILLIGAN SAMUEL W M 34 SON M WORKS ON FARM PA PA PA
(4) 27 MILLIGAN ESTHER W F 36 WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE PA PA PA

If you can't decide whether two families should be merged into one, you may want to take the general behavior of the enumerator into account. Some of them are hyperactive when it comes to family numbers, and seem to split every dwelling into multiple families. So if there are lots of similar problems on a particular reel, that is probably a sign that the enumerator's family numbers are not to be trusted.

Example 9 shows a typical hyperactive enumerator. Under the census rules, all of the residents of hotels are to be treated as members of a single family. But in this case all of the hotel servants are treated as separate families. They should all be made part of family 205.

In general, servants and boarders are supposed to be treated as part of the family with whom they reside, even if they take their meals separately. However, we should treat families of boarders who have their own family number as separate units. In the case of servants with their own family number, check the occupation of the dwelling head to see if it looks really plausible that they are servants of the head; if so, merge them with the head's family.

Under all circumstances, the first listed individual in any family taken under rules 1 or 2 should be a head; if they are not, you should either change the REL or merge two families into one.


Dwelling [ 177 1882 11]    Rule: 1    DWSIZE: 7    NBRFAMS: 6    SEQFAM: 1    FAMSIZE: 2    NBRTAKEN: 7
(3) First position not HEAD
(3) Operator Comment: REL ERR; HEAD
(4) First position not HEAD
(4) Operator Comment: REL ERR; HEAD
(5) First position not HEAD
(5) Operator Comment: REL ERR; HEAD
(6) First position not HEAD
(6) Operator Comment: REL ERR; HEAD
(7) First position not HEAD
(7) Operator Comment: REL ERR; HEAD

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBPL
(1) 205 CARNY SIMON W M 33 HEAD M HOTEL FRANCE FRANCE FRAN
(2) 205 CARNY ALICE W F 22 WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE CA TN NY
(3) 206 TERRIUS JUSTINA W F 27 CHAMBERMAID S CHAMBERMAID CA MEXICO MEXI
(4) 207 TADLOCK FRANK E. JR W M 27 MANAGER S HOTEL MANAGER UTAH TN NY
(5) 208 KRESS HENRY W M 28 STEWARD S HOTEL STEWARD CA GER GER
(6) 209 AH LEON C M 40 COOK M HOTEL COOK CHINA CHINA CHIN
(7) 210 AH YEN C M 25 SERV S HOTEL SERV CHINA CHINA CHIN

5. (xx) WIFE not in second position

This message indicates a problem about 90 percent of the time. Sometimes, the person listed as wife is really a daughter-in-law, as in the example given on page 1. Most commonly, however, this message indicates a secondary family, or a "Co-head" situation.

A secondary family is a group of related persons who are apparently unrelated to the family head. Check the surnames and parental birthplaces to ensure that they have no clear relationships to the head; be aware of relatives who may have different surnames, such as parents-in-law or married daughters. If you are persuaded that a related group is unrelated to the head, change them into a secondary family by putting a '$' in the first column of the relationship field.

Example 10. At first glance this looks like a classic secondary family. William and Julia Ferguson are just an elderly married couple residing with the widow Vincent. But notice that the VA/AL parental birthplaces of the head just match the Fergusons. It cannot be coincidence! William should therefore be changed to '@FATHER' and Julia to '@MOTHER'.


Example 10:

Dwelling [311 5272 37] Rule: 1 DWSIZE: 10 NBRFAMS: 1 SEQFAM: 1 FAMSIZE: 10 NBRTAKEN: 10
(9) Blank REL
(10) WIFE not in second position

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBPL
(1) 637 VINCENT CATERINA O W F 46 HEAD W KEEPING HOUSE AL VA AL
(2) 637 VINCENT BENJAMIN W M 21 SON S BOOKKEEPER AL AL AL
(3) 637 VINCENT LOUISA O W F 19 DAU S AT HOME AL AL AL
(4) 637 VINCENT JOHN K W M 16 SON S AT SCHOOL AL AL AL
(5) 637 VINCENT ALEXINA T W F 13 DAU S AT SCHOOL AL AL AL
(6) 637 VINCENT ANNA M W F 11 DAU S AT SCHOOL AL AL AL
(7) 637 VINCENT CHARLES E W M 9 SON S AT SCHOOL AL AL AL
(8) 637 VINCENT FANNIE D W F 7 DAU S AT SCHOOL AL AL AL
(9) 637 FERGUSON WILLIAM W M 78 % M RETIRED VA VA VA
(10) 637 FERGUSON JULIA W F 74 WIFE M AT HOME AL AL AL

Example 11. The Youmans and the Wallaces, on the other hand, have no indication of a relationship at all. Therefore change O. V. Wallace to '$HEAD', Mary J to '$WIFE', and Frank to '$SON'. Note that this one was flagged by a different surname message as well as a wife out of order message, which is pretty typical.


Example 11:

Dwelling [ 28 242 45] Rule: 1 DWSIZE: 6 NBRFAMS: 1 SEOFAM: 1 FAMSIZE: 6 NBRTAKEN: 6
(4) Blank REL
(5) WIFE not in second position
(6) Child has different surname from head

FAMNO Last Name First Name R S AGE Relationship M W Occupation BPL PBPL MBPL
(1) 315 YOUMANS S G W M 58 HEAD M FARMER NY NY NY
(2) 315 YOUMANS RUTH W F 61 WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE NY NY NY
(3) 315 YOUMANS SAMUEL W M 17 SON S AT SCHOOL CA NY NY
(4) 315 WALLACE O V W M 44 M CARPENTER OH PA PA
(5) 315 WALLACE MARY J W F 40 WIFE M KEEPING HOUSE SCOTLAND SCOTLAND SCOTL
(6) 315 WALLACE FRANK W M 19 SON S FARMER CO OH SCOTL

Sometimes you will encounter a wife in the first position. These cases should ordinarily be changed to head, whether or not a husband is also present elsewhere in the household. Finally, you will encounter some cases in which the wife is out of the second position but is really the wife of the head. No changes are then necessary.

6. (xx) Blank REL

This message will appear whenever there is an imbedded blank relationship within a household. Don't worry about it much, but if you think the relationship is clear, fill it in. The parental birthplaces may be a clue, as in Example 10.

7. (xx) Bad SEX and REL combination

This is a whole different kind of error. Use the first name to determine if the sex or the rel is incorrect; if it is the rel, don't worry about it unless it is a WIFE, since the rels are going to get recoded into non sex-specific categories anyway. If the sex is wrong, fix it and put the string '@SEX' in the comment field. If the first name is inconclusive don't do anything.

8. (xx) Operator Comment: REL ERR;relation

The operator comments are mostly included as an aid in your decision-making, but as you can see in examples 8 and 9, they are often incorrect, so be careful. When an operator comment appears with no other message, then you usually will not need to make any changes. If, however, the operator seems to you to be clearly correct, go ahead and make the change she suggested.

SOME CHECKING RULES BY EXAMPLE

1. Although it may be obvious that HD2 is the son of HD1, no change is made to the record since all relationships "make sense." Family numbers stay the same.

FAMNO RELATION
160 HD1
161 HD2
161 WF
161 DAU

2. When family numbers are the same and HD2 is the son of HD1, fix the relationship so that HD2=SON, WF = DAULAW, DAU = GDAU.

FAMNO RELATION
160 HD1
160 D2
160 WF
160 DAU

3. When family number changes with son's family, but the relationships treat the household as a single family, change family number and keep relation-ships (@FAMNO).

FAMNO RELATION
160 HD1
161 SON
161 DAULAW
161 GDAU

4. If same family number, but there is more than one HD (which are not related), make the second head "HD$". If the heads are clearly related (and family number is the same) impose the relationship.

5. When it is obvious that the enumerator is at a new or different house, modify relationships in the second dwelling if the head's relationship in the second dwelling is in reference to the head of the previous dwelling. In below example, change SON = @HD, DAULAW = @WF, GDAU = @DAU.

ADDRESS DWELLNO FAMNO RELATION
5 160 170 HD
6 161 170 SON
6 161 170 DAULAW
6 161 170 GDAU

6. In the case where boarders and lodgers are listed under a new family number, change the family number for these individuals. '156' for both lodger and boarder becomes '155' with '@FAMNO' in the comment field.

FAMNO RELATION
155 HD1
155 WF
156 LDG
156 BRD

7. However, if two lodgers are lodgers are husband and wife, the first lodger's relationship is changed to @HD and the second to @WF.

FAMNO RELATION
155 HD1
155 WF
156 @HD
156 @WF

8. If the record includes a group of same last names but relation is indiscernible between multiple heads, create a new family number by changing the second head to HD$.

FAMNO LASTNM RELATION BPLC
236 JONES HD1 PA
236 JONES WF PA
236 JONES HD2 PA
236 JONES WF PA

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